Bundle up! Finland’s in for a seriously chilly winter ahead

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The winter, the period from December to February, was colder than usual, according to the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI).

Temperatures were widely 1–3 degrees Celsius below the long-term average. The last time winter was such colder in a large part of the country in 2011, said the FMI in a press release on Wednesday.

February was fairly ordinary in temperatures, but December and January, which were clearly colder than average, caused the whole winter to be recorded as colder than usual.

The average temperature in the winter varied between about minus 1 degree Celsius in the southwest archipelago to minus 14 degrees Celsius in Eastern and Northern Lapland.

The lowest temperature for the winter, minus 44.3 degrees Celsius, was recorded at the Enontekiö Airport on January 5, which was also the lowest temperature measured in Finland in the 2000s.

The highest temperature for the winter, +6.8 degrees Celsius, was recorded at the Kökar observation station in Bogskär, on December 19.

The precipitation from December to February was close to the typical level, with the west coast and Lapland experiencing precipitation slightly below the long-term average levels.

According to preliminary data, the highest precipitation for the winter months, 207.6 mm, was recorded at the Kumpula observation station in Helsinki. The lowest precipitation, 59.9 mm, was recorded at the Nellim observation station in Inari.

According to the FMI, February's average temperature was fairly typical. The average temperature of the month varied between about minus 1 degree Celsius in the southwest archipelago to approximately minus 12 degrees in Eastern Lapland. The deviation from the long-term average was about one degree above the average in the southern part of the country and in Northern Lapland, in other parts of the country the average temperatures were close to normal.

The lowest temperature for the month, minus 39.7 degrees, was recorded at the Tulppio observation station in Savukoski, on February 9. The highest temperature for the month, +6.2 degrees, was recorded at the Santahaka observation station in Kokkola, on February 24.

With the exception of Lapland, February was more rainy than usual, in places even exceptionally rainy.

According to preliminary data, the highest amount of precipitation in February was recorded in Kangasniemi village, where the total amount of rainfall was 90 mm.

The highest amount of precipitation within a 24-hour period, 36.8 mm, was measured at the Jomalaby observation station in Jomala, on February 16. The lowest amount of precipitation was recorded at the Näkkälä observation station in Enontekiö, only 11.6 mm.

At the end of February, snow was found at all observation stations in mainland Finland. There was no snow in the Åland Islands and in parts of the southwest archipelago.

Snow cover was deepest, 111 cm, at the Puolanka Paljakka observation station in Kainuu. Especially in the central part of the country, the amount of snow was higher than usual, even exceptionally high at some places from Central Finland to Kainuu. On the southern coast and in Eastern Lapland, there were areas with less snow than average.

February saw 30‒70 hours of sunshine. Generally speaking, the number of hours of direct sunlight was slightly below usual.

Source: www.dailyfinland.fi

13 Comments
  1. LauraSmith1990 says

    I can’t believe how cold the winter was in Finland! It’s really interesting to see such extreme temperatures affecting the whole country. Hopefully, the weather will get milder soon.

  2. Evelyn99 says

    Was there any specific reason mentioned by the Finnish Meteorological Institute for the colder temperatures during December and January?

    1. LucasSmith88 says

      According to the Finnish Meteorological Institute, the colder temperatures during December and January were attributed to a combination of specific weather patterns and atmospheric conditions that led to the below-average temperatures experienced throughout the winter.

  3. MeganJohnson says

    As a resident of Finland, I can confirm that this winter has indeed been exceptionally chilly. The temperatures have been consistently colder than usual, making it quite a challenge to stay warm. Bundle up, everyone!

  4. EmmaSmith123 says

    I absolutely love winter, and I’m thrilled to hear that Finland is in for a seriously chilly one ahead! Cold temperatures make everything so cozy, and I can’t wait for snow days and hot cocoa by the fireplace. Bring on the frosty adventures!

  5. Megan74 says

    Was there any specific reason mentioned for the colder temperatures in December and January compared to February?

    1. AndrewHiker says

      Hey Megan74, it seems that the colder temperatures in December and January were due to specific weather patterns that lingered during those months. February, on the other hand, experienced more typical temperatures. The Finnish Meteorological Institute noted that the last time such significant cold prevailed was back in 2011. Stay warm!

  6. Emily_Snowflake says

    I absolutely love the cold weather during winter! It’s the perfect time to cozy up with a hot cup of cocoa and enjoy the beautiful winter scenery. I’m thrilled to hear that Finland is in for a seriously chilly winter ahead. Can’t wait to embrace the frosty temperatures and maybe even build a snowman or two!

  7. EmilyHiker78 says

    In my opinion, this chilly winter in Finland is a reminder of the unpredictable nature of weather patterns. It’s fascinating to see how temperatures can vary so drastically and create unique conditions for different regions of the country. Stay warm, everyone!

  8. Emily_Rose123 says

    I think it’s important for everyone to stay warm and take extra precautions during such chilly winters. It’s fascinating to see the precise temperature data and comparisons provided by the Finnish Meteorological Institute!

  9. EmilySmith says

    As a Finnish resident, I can attest to the exceptionally cold winter we’ve been experiencing. The temperatures have been significantly below average, making it a challenging season to endure. I hope spring arrives soon!

  10. AliceSmith21 says

    Does this mean we should expect similar cold temperatures in Finland for the upcoming winter too?

    1. JohnDoe89 says

      Based on the information provided by the Finnish Meteorological Institute, it is possible that Finland might experience similarly cold temperatures in the upcoming winter. It’s always good to be prepared and bundle up to stay warm!

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